File Under: Hot Dates – Cambalache, One Night in Argentina!

Cambalache
The Dizzy Fizz is proud to be a media partner for  Cambalache – One Night in Argentina, a cutting-edge celebration of Argentine wine and culture blasting some much-needed South American warmth to the Brooklyn Night Bazaar warehouse in Williamsburg on April 16 & 17.

This two-day event, coinciding with World Malbec Day on April 17, is not your typical wine tasting. Expect a multi-sensory experience showcasing the passion, complexity and contradictions that define Argentine culture. Guests can indulge in empanadas, Argentine beef, dulce de leche ice cream, wine-based cocktails, and of course, unlimited malbec and other wines from 26 of the top Argentine wineries.

In addition you’ll be invited to witness infamous Argentinian graffiti artists painting murals at an outdoor street party; venture into a rustic estancia to drink traditional ‘mate’ tea with authentic Argentinian cowboys; dance Nuevo Tango in a Buenos Aires nightclub; get a lesson in street slang to stir up trouble in downtown Buenos Aires; learn the unconventional art of pairing wines with music with a couple of English professors; and hear a bass-heavy global electronic music set by DJ Uproot Andy.

Tickets are available for $80, and for a limited time, Dizzy Fizz readers can use the code VINO to save $20 on pair of tickets, bringing the price to $140.

Included in your Cambalache ticket is the chance to win a set of two airline tickets to travel from New York-JFK to Buenos Aires on Aerolineas Argentinas plus three nights accommodation at the Pan Americano hotel. Winners will be announced each night at 9pm at the event and must be present to win.

Wednesday, April 16, and Thursday, April 17, 6 to 11 p.m. each night. 165 Banker Street, Brooklyn, 11222.

Cambalache 2

Cambalache 3

Dizzy Recap: Glenrothes Tasting at Mary Queen of Scots

From guest blogger Carmen Operetta:

It’s a new year and hopefully you have survived the winter season swimmingly. In most parts of the temperate countries in the world, snow has been a no show or just a wee bit of a tease this year! Whisky drinkers are used to snuggling up in front of a warm crackling fire with a proper dram in hand in these wintry months, cold snap or not. Well, I have a whisky for you to revisit and indulge in, along with a new release and an expression that is about to be out of production!

Glenrothes recently held a spirits tasting and dinner at one of NYC’s top Scottish restaurants, Mary Queen of Scots. The whiskies were paired with sandwich selections from the menu, such as the Tobermory (Scottish cheddar, crispy figs and sourdough bread) and the Pawlet (American gouda, pancetta and roasted pears on a brioche bun).

The Tasting Menu and Notes:

  1. The Glenrothes Select Reserve: No age statement, slightly fruity with caramel on the nose, vanilla with orange and lemon on the palate, elegant, complex, and terrific for cocktails. Great before and after dinner.
  2. The Glenrothes Vintage 1985: Get this one if you can!! It’s almost out of stock, and it’s hard to say with every expression tasting amazing, but this is one of my favorite! This fantastic almost rum-like dram is very chocolatey with honey and spicy notes on the nose. Oak, vanilla and orange on the palate with a silky long finish. A delectable after dinner dram.
  3. The Glenrothes Vintage 1994: Ahh….. what another great expression.This is amazing in cocktails too! On the nose, toffee and honey. Full of zesty lemon, orange, creamy vanilla, and toffee. Medium to long finish. An incredible before and after dinner dram.
  4. The Glenrothes Vintage 1995: So silky on the palate that I didn’t want to add water, but did it anyway to experience the full flavor profile. Loads of vanilla with some red grapes on the nose. Butterscotch, lemon, vanilla and honey on the palate. Medium to long finish…..such a lovely after dinner dram.
  5. The Glenrothes Editor’s Cask: For all of the lovers of tobacco and full-bodied whisky, you’ll love this one! The super dark chocolate color is very appealing and tempting on the eye. Orange and syrupy on the nose. It’s rich in dark fleshy fruits, dried fruits, orange, honey, tobacco leaf, spicy, and coffee notes. A long finish with more coffee and dark chocolate notes. This is an all of the time dram!

We were also treated with custom Glenrothes Cocktails by Mary Queen of Scots bartender John McCarthy:

The McQueen (Glenrothes Select Reserve, Fidencio Mezcal, dark agave syrup, orange and chocolate bitters)

Presbyterian Revenge (Glenrothes Select Reserve, Cynar, lemon juice, simple syrup and soda)

The Highland Fling (Glenrothes Select Reserve, Yellow Chartreuse, maraschino liqueur, lemon juice and grapefruit bitters)

While the limited-run Editor’s Cask is being sold for $375, the Glenrothes Select Reserve used in these cocktails is an easy-drinking Speyside retailing for about $35, making it a smart choice for mixing at home.

Glenrothes Editor's Cask, a limited release, retails for $375.

Carmen Operetta is the CEO/Founder/Writer of Planet Operetta Productions, a primarily whisky-based production company which consults, presents events/seminars, and creates programming for the whisky category. She is currently launching a NYC based whisky consultancy division and continuously researching whisky between NYC and the UK in order to distill the first American Scottish peated style whisky.

“Malt drinkers are for thinkers and blended drinkers are for drinkers” – Ronnie Cox

Dizzy Recap: Anchor Distilling Whisky Tasting

Black Bull 12 Year, a unique 100-proof blend of 50% malt and 50% grain.

From guest blogger Carmen Operetta:

It’s that time of year again when it gets cooler as the wintery months approach–the perfect time to wrap ourselves in the warmth of the dram. Recently, I had the honor to attend an Anchor Distilling whisky portfolio tasting that my dear friend and colleague Mrs. Selena Ricks-Good invited me to experience. I am guest writing this article for The Dizzy Fizz, because I guess my pal thinks I know a thing or two about whisky and will gladly share it with the Dizzy Fizz audience.

The whisky pairing dinner was held at St. Andrews restaurant, where I chose the haggis with neeps and tatties to start and then I moved on to the grilled New Zealand rack of lamb as the main course. To finish off this proper Scottish meal, I enjoyed the St. Andrews Cranachan, which is a tasty dessert oatmeal made with whisky, raspberries, Scottish heather honey and double cream. Now that’s what I call dessert–or maybe breakfast!

Three flights were presented by Euan Shand (Duncan Taylor), Allistair Walker (BenRiach/GlenDronach Distillery) and Ranald Watson (Springbank/Longrow/Kilkerran Distillers). The flight selection was created by Steve Fox, the category director at Anchor Distilling Co.

Now sit back and take a look at some fantastic whiskies that I think you should add to your collection and/or enjoy this season:

Flight 1:

Kilkerran 7 year old, Glengyle distillery
Color: light-medium golden honey
Nose: citrus and sweet spice with  lingering sweet toffee
Palate: salty sweet vanilla

Linkwood 19 year old Cask #10221, Duncan Taylor
Color: vibrant light honey
Nose: woody with a light aroma of plums
Palate: dark chocolate and raspberries with a light honey sweetness finishing it off.
*A  top pick

Springbank 12 year old cask strength
Color: rich medium-dark brown
Nose: wet grass and wood, a touch of peat smoke, sweet butterscotch
Palate: powerful sweet spices, sea spray, chocolate, with a silky texture

Note: I added a few drops of water and experienced a beautiful bouquet of roses on the nose.

Lonach Glendarroch 1966 42 year old
Color: medium brown
Nose: soft, supple, and creamy
Palate: cream brulee, apples, pears, and bananas

Note: A few words on this special dram: Lonach in gaeilc means “gathering.” Every year, the Strathdon area in the Highlands of Scotland is home to a clan gathering, normally held the last week of August.
* A top pick

Flight 2:

Springbank 14 year old Manzanilla Cask #305
Color: beautiful dark cherry
Nose: honey, raisins, sweet, buttery, brown sugar, and dry
Palate: oaky, dry, and floral

Note: This is a very complex whisky that is exclusively created for the USA. It is distilled 2 ½ times.

Black Bull 12 year old
Color: dark golden brown
Nose: spicy with burnt sugar
Palate: rich, slightly hot, and sweet

Note: This is the first ever 100% proof blend, which consists of 50% malted barley and 50% grain.

GlenDronach 15 year old
Color: dark rich brown
Nose: big sherry and sweet
Palate: melon, moderately hot, with vanilla

Note: I like to add a few drops of water to this dram. A lavish honeycomb sweetness shines through!

GlenDronach 1995 Pedro Ximenez
Color: golden honey comb
Nose: vanilla bean and molasses
Palate: dates, raisins, and oranges

Flight 3:

BenRiach Curiositas Single Malt 10 year old
Color: light golden brown
Nose: grassy, peat smoke, and salty
Palate:peaty, mixed nuts and fruits, oak, and wood

Note: The first 6 weeks of production at BenRiach are strictly for peated production and the average age in this 10 year is 16 years old.
*A top pick

BenRiach 1995 Pedro Ximenez 15 year old Cask #7165
Color: light-medium rich brown
Nose: light smoke and citrus
Palate: spicy, lemon, and tropical fruits
*A top pick

Duncan Taylor NC2 1997 Bunnahabhain 12 year old peated
Color: medium- dark brown
Nose: bacon, butter, oranges, and leather
Palate: meaty, jammy, fruity, oily

Note: NC2 means non-chill filtered and this sophisticated dram has 40 ppm
*A top pick

Longrow CV
Color: light brown
Nose: sweet honey, brine, and peat
Palate: lemon, spice, sweet, oak, bark, ginger

Note: This dram has been matured in multiple casks and has the average of about 6, 10, and 14 years in this beauty.

Carmen Operetta is the CEO/Founder/Writer of Planet Operetta Productions, a primarily whisky-based production company which consults, presents events/seminars, and creates programming for the whisky category. She is currently researching whisky between NYC and the UK in order to distill the first American Scottish style whisky.

Dizzy Recap: Macchu Pisco Nusta Pisco Tasting

Sparkling sake and pisco cocktail with a grape garnish at Zengo.

From guest blogger Stephanie Moreno:

I was recently invited to a tasting highlighting piscos from the Peruvian company, Macchu Pisco at Richard Sandoval’s restaurant, Zengo in New York City.  The occasion was to showcase a special pisco called Nusta Pisco.  The special menu was entitled “Lima to Tokyo,” a menu combining Japanese and Peruvian cuisines which was both complex and focused at the same time. By the end of the evening, we had tasted three piscos neat and several cocktails made with ingredients such as sake, rum and Japanese whisky.

As my expertise is more on fermented and distilled products, I’ll turn my attention to the pisco.  As a distillate from fruit, grapes in this case, pisco is a brandy.  I am not going to get into the Chile vs. Peru debate regarding whose pisco reigns supreme, but for those of you who know me, you can probably guess my preference. What I find most impressive about Peruvian pisco is, on top of not being allowed to age in barrel, it must be distilled to proof.  This means no water can be added to bring it down.  What you distill is what you get.

Peruvian Pisco 101:  Ok, so it’s distilled from wine made from grapes.  What grapes are we talking about here? There are eight varietals which can be used:  Quebranta, Negra Criolla, Mollar, Italia, Muscat, Albilla, Torontel and Uvina.  There are also four different styles:  Acholado (literally meaning half breed, but we can remember this as a mixture), Aromatics (as the name suggests it’s a style intensely aromatic with a grapey profile), Puro (a single varietal most typically made using the Querbranta grape or another non-aromatic), Green Must aka Mosto Verde (the must or grape juice is not fully fermented).

Macchu Pisco’s namesake pisco is a Puro produced using the non-aromatic Quebranta grape. I find the nose to be very subtle with fresh green grape skin aromas along with a touch of an earthy minerality.  Their La Diablada Pisco is produced in an Acholado style from Quebranta, Muscat and Italia.  This is a mix of aromatic and non aromatic varietals and creates an intense grapey fragrance with a slightly slick mouth feel.  I also got a taste memory of red hot cinnamon candies upon exhalation, so the name, La Diablada, fits.

We tasted those two piscos neat to kick off our dinner.  Our dessert was their latest product called Nusta Pisco, which is produced in a Mosto Verde style. This can be produced from a variety of grapes, but they have chosen to only use the aromatic Italia grape.  In this style, the fermentation is stopped leaving sugars that have not been converted to alcohol.  Despite this, it is still bottled at 80 proof.  What I found in the glass was an orange and grape profile with a touch of green herbaceousness playing along.

Unfortunately, unless you are willing to rack up some air miles by taking a trip to the UK, you won’t be able to taste this rare product–for the foreseeable future, the Nusta Pisco is not being released in the US.  Only 100 bottles are produced each year, retailing for $100 each.

Macchu Pisco's rare Nusta Pisco.

Dizzy Recap: Blogger Brunch at Yotel

Since the summer weather doesn’t appear to be fading anytime soon, you still have time to soak up the rooftop brunch experience at Yotel New York, where The Dizzy Fizz hosted an end-of-summer Blogger Brunch last month. Each weekend, the indoor/outdoor Terrace restaurant on the ultra-modern hotel’s fourth floor offers a $35 all-you-can-eat-and-drink two-hour special–essentially, a boozy feast worthy of epic brunching. The Asian- inspired tapas menu by chef Richard Sandoval offers a refreshing take on brunch standards such as bacon fried rice with kimchi and fried egg, fruit and granola with yuzu yogurt and grilled salmon with achiote ponzu, spinach and bacon. Order as many small plates as you want during the two-hour time frame, but take note that if you arrive during peak brunch hours, you may have to order a bunch of dishes at once in order to get your fill in time.

While writers from outlets such as Socially Superlative, The Skinny Pig, Mouth of the Border, The Wandering Foodie and more sipped carafes full of peach and bourbon punch and passion plantation punch, other brunch cocktails include the lychee bellini, mango mimosa and bacon bloody mary.

Although the brouhaha of Times Square is just a few steps away, Yotel’s spacious rooftop has a zen-like quality with its white and purple foam furniture, bamboo trees and cabanas, while still offering Midtown skyline views. For those times when you find yourself in the no man’s land of Times Square West/Hell’s Kitchen, the scene at Yotel is a definite must-visit for any discerning drinker or diner. Brunch on!

Yotel is located at 570 10th Ave. at 42nd Street. 646-449-7790.

Dizzy Recap: Bols Barrel Aged Genever Preview

Bols Barrel Aged Genever, launching in September. Photos by Lush Life Productions.

From guest blogger Stephanie Moreno:

“Genever needs to be courted.”  –Gaz Regan

On a recent rainy, chilly August afternoon, an invitation to a dark, cozy lounge seemed a perfect idea. I was further enticed with the promise of a sneak peek of the new Bols Barrel Aged Genever to be released in September (and expected to retail for about $50).  Held at NoHo’s The Vault at Pfaff’s bar, invited guests were given an opportunity to meet and listen to Piet Van Leijenhorst, Bols’ Master Distiller.  Frank Cisneros, their Brand Ambassador, was on hand to shake and stir cocktails, and I couldn’t wait to learn (and taste) it all.

As we waited for the presentation to begin, we were given an “aperitif” so to speak:  a Genever Collins cocktail.  I loved the bright and sunny lemon drink as it was such a stark difference from the wet and rainy day.  The Genever’s weight added a nice richness with a touch of sweetness that balanced the acidity of the drink.

Subsequently, Van Leijenhorst began his discussion of the product he clearly is proud to make.  He discussed his desire for Americans to think not think of Genever as a gin, but rather more like a whiskey.  He then explained how their Genever is made, and so shall I:

Genever technically is a type of gin, but to all intents and purposes, it is best to think of Genever as its own category.  In fact, in 2007, it was given protected spirit status like Cognac. There are a few types of Genevers out there, but let’s just talk about two:  Oude (old) and Jonge (young). These are types that do not refer to the Genever’s time aging, but rather the amount of “malt wine” that is used in its production. Oude has to use at least 15% malt wine, Jonge is less than 15%. It is easy to remember in the sense of old vs. new school methods.  In Bols’ case, they use over 50%.  But, what is this malt wine?

According to Van Leijenhorst, it is a “critical thing” and “the overwhelming taste comes from the malt wine.”  It consists of rye, wheat and corn that is triple-distilled (once in column and twice in pot stills) and then allowed to marry for six to eight weeks. The juniper and other botanical distillates (which include hops, anise, cinnamon and ginger root, among others) are then added to the malt wine.  This is then aged for at least 18 months in new and used Limousin oak barrels.

As the education continued, we were given the Aged Barrel Genever neat in an Old Fashioned glass, sans ice. Upon nosing the spirit, I found subtle wood spices from the wood aging with the tasting profile leading to a lush and spicy sip.  Notes of juniper, vanilla, pine, mint and cinnamon were some of what I discovered.  Variations of the classic cocktails the Manhattan and the Mint Julep were served to highlight the idea that Genever can be a substitute for American whiskey. I do agree with this sentiment, but as lovely as the cocktails that Frank made for us were, my favorite “cocktail” was just slowly sipping the Genever neat, room temperature.  My hope is that whether you are a gin lover or a whiskey lover, you ease into a relationship with Genever. As Gaz Regan said, Genever “…deserves to be courted and loved for its very distinctive personality.”  Hear, hear, sir!

Bols Master Distiller Piet Van Liejenhorst.

Stephanie Moreno is a professional spirits taster and can be found on Twitter @brooklynwino.

File Under: Hot Dates

Whisky rocks! Yours truly and Carmen Operetta going wild for Ardbeg at Whisky Live 2010.

  • Oh, is there a football game on this weekend? Super Bowl fan or not, I think we can all rally around Union Square Wines’ Martini Bowl 2011, taking place from 2 to 5 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 5. Taste more than a dozen types of martinis featuring top vodkas and gins, including locally distilled spirits, all for free–game on!
  • And in case you haven’t heard, Louis 649′s Tuesday Night Tastings, free tastings featuring a different spirit every week, are back in effect. At 7 p.m. this Tuesday, Feb. 8, sip Redemption Rye with brand representative Dave Schmier.
  • Although Whisky Live New York is two months away, now is the time to get your tickets for the April 6 event–brown spirits extravaganzas like this sell out fast. Taking place at the same venue as last year, Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers, the focus this year will be on raising awareness that Scotch and bourbon are whiskies too, said event organizer Jeffery Connell. Cruise the tasting hall while you sip drams of whisky from Kentucky to Scotland, meeting the distillers, producers and ambassadors behind the brands. I attended last year, and whiskies I tried included Maker’s 46 and Suntory’s Hibiki 12, which weren’t even on the market yet. I watched a live iron bartender competition featuring some of NYC’s top mixologists, entered an Ardbeg chopper sweepstakes (guess I didn’t win), and  I even recall some amazing chocolate truffles among the impressive buffet spread. Mostly, it was a memorable event where I connected with whisky fans from all over–I hope to see you there this year!

Don’t Miss The Holiday Spirits Bazaar!

Come one, come all to the first-ever Holiday Spirits Bazaar, taking place tomorrow, Dec. 11, at The Green Building at 450 Union St., Brooklyn. VIP admission starts at 4 p.m. for $25, and regular admission is from 5 to 10 p.m. for $20 (purchase tickets here). A portion of proceeds from this holiday cocktail tasting and shopping extravaganza, brought to you by The Dizzy Fizz, will benefit the Museum of the American Cocktail.

Get inspired to host a spirited party of your own as you sip holiday drinks by fine brands such as: Denizen Rum, Auchentoshan Single Malt Scotch, Tempus Fugit Spirits, Vermont Gold & White Vodka, Cockspur Rum, Classic & Vintage Spirits, Purity Vodka, Square One Organic Spirits, Haus Alpenz, FAIR Trade Spirits, Scorpion Mezcal, Redemption Rye, Don Q Rum, Hudson Whiskey, Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur, Pipeline Brands, Highland Park Single Malt Scotch, Chairman’s Rum, Castries Peanut Liqueur and Innis & Gunn Cask-Aged Beer.

Need to get some holiday shopping done? We have some amazing vendors such as: Fette Sau BBQ selling pulled-pork and brisket sandwiches, Emily Thompson Flowers selling wreaths and and table centerpieces, Etsy craft designers Jesse Tobin and Elisabeth Prescott selling accessories, SkimKim Foods selling kimchee bloody mary mix, and author Kara Newman signing and selling copies of her book, “Spice & Ice!”

And don’t miss out on a silent auction to benefit MOTAC, featuring: artwork by Jill DeGroff, jewelry by Aroc Urtu, vintage French absinthe and liqueur posters, a three-night stay at Lenell Smothers’ Casa Coctel in Mexico, a Tuthilltown Distillery gift pack, and more!

Plus DJ TomasMoves on the decks, gravity-defying dance performance, and plenty other surprises!

Hope to see you there!

Must be 21+ to attend. Please drink responsibly.

Photo by Lush Life Productions.

 

Exclusive: $15 Discount on Women & Whiskey Event Nov. 8!

Photo by Lush Life Productions.

Readers of The Dizzy Fizz, treat yourself to an exclusive discount for one of the season’s most enticing events, Liquor.com’s Tasting for Whiskey-Loving Women at Brandy Library! Simply enter the code “DZZFZZ” when purchasing tickets to save 33 percent off the $45 price.

The event, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov.8, celebrates the growing demographic of female whiskey enthusiasts (men are invited to join as well). While whiskey has long been considered a “man’s drink,” this event seeks to put an end to that nonsense with tastings of dozens of Scottish single malts, including bottlings from Ardbeg, Auchentoshan, Balvenie, Bowmore, Glen Grant, Glenfiddich, Glenmorangie, Glenrothes and Jura, plus bourbon, as well as whiskies from Ireland and even Japan. Rare and delicious whiskies will include: Ardbeg Supernova, Glenmorangie Signet, The Glenrothes Vintage 1985 and Hibiki 12-Year-Old.

As if that weren’t enough, some of the best female bartenders in town will be behind the stick shaking up whiskey cocktails. Guests can indulge in complimentary artisanal cheeses and chocolates to round out this luxurious tasting.

What are you waiting for? Tickets available here.

On Tap: NYC Distilleries Now Pouring

 

Brad Estabrooke of Breuckelen Distilling Co. shows off his drinking philosophy.

 “When I sell liquor, it’s called bootlegging; when my patrons serve it on Lake Shore Drive, it’s called hospitality.”–Al Capone

On Sunday, August 1st, I nearly shed a tear as I witnessed a historic moment in NYC drinking culture–the first spirits distilled here since the days of Prohibition were served to the general public at two Brooklyn locations. Kings County Distillery, the little moonshine makers that could, poured their unaged corn whiskey–which also features malted Scottish barley for added complexity–at UVA Wines & Spirits in Williamsburg, while Breuckelen Distilling Co. flung open its Sunset Park doors to a thirsty crowd for tastings of its wheat-based gin and tours of its small factory centered around a 400-liter German copper still.

I visited both distilleries last month before they opened, and the yeast-scented anticipation hanging in the air was nothing short of infectious. Hard at work on a daily basis since spring, Brad Estabrooke of Breuckelen and Kings County’s Colin Spoelman and David Haskell–all in their early 30s–represent the new generation of distillers pioneering the artisanal spirits renaissance. Recent changes to state law have made microdistilling easier and more affordable. But unlike their rural New York counterparts, these guys face the unique challenges of their urban environs.

“I don’t think there’s any distillery in the country doing what we’re doing,” said Colin, who works by day as an architect before spending up to 8 hours a night at Kings County’s 325 square-foot warehouse in East Williamsburg. “Our stills are 8 gallons each. We’re essentially doing what a home distiller is doing, but times four. It offers certain taste advantages, certain integrity advantages.”

Colin, a Kentucky native, has been a moonshine hobbyist for years, while David, a magazine editor, had a bootlegging great-grandfather. Along with their three apprentices, they continuously monitor the cooking of organic New York corn and malted Scottish barley into their fermented mash before sending it through their small pot stills.

Due to the limited size of the operation, David and Colin bottle their moonshine in 200ml flasks selling for $20. Kings County is also placing its white dog in 5-gallon oak barrels, to eventually be bottled as bourbon. And they recently purchased another space within their building on Meadow Street that will be turned into a tasting room.

With a production output of about three times the size of Kings County’s, Breuckelen Distilling Co. at 77 19th St. is a dream come true for Brad, who came up with the idea to start a distillery with his girlfriend, Liz O’Connell.

“We were sitting around having drinks one day, discussing how we don’t like our jobs,” said Brad, a former bond trader who grew up in Maine. “We thought it would be rewarding to produce something. Then I was reading an in-flight magazine article that mentioned that the federal rules for distilling had changed, and that there was a revolution in micro-distilling. I immediately knew that was what I wanted to do.”

At Breuckelen, organic New York wheat is milled and fermented before going into the 16-foot still with eight plates which can be adjusted to result in a stronger or lighter wheat flavor. Brad then returns the wheat spirit to the still with juniper berries, lemon peel, grapefruit peel, rosemary and ginger to produce his gin. The nutty wheat grounds the botanical notes of the gin, offering a unique product for $35 per 750ml bottle. Brad said he is considering bottling the wheat spirit on its own, and is already planning a winter edition of his gin.

“I think people who are interested in trying different spirits, not just the mass-marketed big brands, will want to try our gin,” said Brad.  “People who appreciate local and artisan crafted, not assembly line.  Anyone who wants to see where and how their spirits are made.”

Kings County’s moonshine can be purchased at UVA and Thirst Wine Merchants in Brooklyn and at Astor Wines & Spirits and Park Avenue Liquor Shop in Manhattan.

And click here for all of the locations to buy Breuckelen Gin in addition to their Sunset Park tasting room.

Kings County Distillery's pot stills.

Corn sourced from upstate New York is the base of the moonshine.

Fermenting corn and malted barley.

200ml flasks of moonshine feature labels made on a typewriter.

Kings County's inaugural tasting day at UVA Wines & Spirit.

Breuckelen Distilling Co. is open for business.

The tasting room at Breuckelen Distilling Co.

Brad Estabrooke leads a tour of his distillery.

This is where the fermenting magic happens.